Wednesday, September 02, 2015

a post with no pictures.

“I don't really care what the "rules" of Zentangle are! I'm not a rule-follower...it’s my art and I’ll do what I want!” 

I see this subject get kicked around on Zentangle fan forums from time to time. I don’t normally engage because I don’t really feel like handing angry people a stick to beat me with, but it’s hard for me to see something so inherently good and useful be misunderstood. So, I want to try to explain it. Please bear in mind that this is my own point of view and I'm not representing anyone else.

Books and Pinterest and YouTube videos are all wonderful sources for patterns for doodling/tangling/patterning/line weaving…. but all of those words are used interchangeably, and that’s where the conflict arises. The confusion seems to come from the fact that that people will refer to any intricate piece of line art as a Zentangle, because they think that’s just the latest buzzword for ‘that thing I was already doing years ago in the margins of notebooks’. 

It is possible to place identical drawings side by side where one is a doodle, and the other is a Zentangle. The reason that’s possible is because the art itself does not make a drawing a Zentangle. The art is the byproduct of the complete mental immersion in the process of ‘tangling’. It all depends on where your mind is when you do it. If you’re in this for the art, these guidelines don't matter one iota. Doodle/draw/sketch away. But if you’re craving a temporary, effective escape plan from pain, grief, or stress (or you just need a mental break) read on, because this information just might come in handy one day.

Yes, the rumors are true: there are guidelines (they're just roads to a destination, really) with Zentangle. And they don’t exist to crush your spirit. Think of them as stout little pillars that work together to support a single purpose: to refocus the mind. Zentangle is mindful. Every guideline exists to make that complete mental immersion possible, and sustain it. That's no easy task in a fast-paced culture (with a constant barrage of distractions) like ours.


#1: The first step in starting a Zentangle: a border and ’string’, drawn lightly in pencil. 

Reason: The pencil line, or string, creates sections to draw within. The string line is merely a suggestion and a place to begin. It is drawn lightly in pencil so that it will disappear behind the ink that follows. Some people have never faced a blank piece of paper and been intimidated and overwhelmed by it, but for those who have, something as simple as having a place to start is a huge relief and can easily mean the difference between success and failure. 


#2: Zentangles are completely abstract.

Reason: This eliminates the preoccupation with whether something looks ‘right’. If it’s supposed to look like a bird but something about it doesn’t look the way it should, that is what you will be preoccupied with. This actually eliminates a whole bunch of other mental hurdles that go along with drawing specific things, e.g. proportion, placement, what goes around it, etc.


#3: Zentangles are drawn only in black ink. 

Reason: This keeps the tangling process as right-brained as possible. To keep the focus on the repetition of the patterns, the slow, deliberate drag of the nib across the paper, the ink soaking into the paper in its wake. With color, decisions must be made: Paint or gel pens? Or marker? How many colors? Which ones? Where do I add them? Do they work together? If you start to add color, that is what you will be preoccupied with. And limiting drawing materials can inspire creativity in surprising ways.


#4: Patterns should be created by drawing repetitive strokes… structured, non-representational, and easy to draw in a limited number of steps.

Reason: The goal is to focus on the strokes of the pen used to create the pattern, and the controlled breathing that happens along with it. The primary goal of drawing a Zentangle is not to draw complicated tangle patterns. Some people are in it for the Zen, some are in it for the art… and there can be a pretty big difference in the way it looks. Which brings us to…


#5: No planned outcome. 

Reason: This aligns with minimizing decision-making. Relaxing into the process and just letting a Zentangle unfold as it appears line by line is calming, and it’s fun to see all those little nuances coming together here and there when opportunities present themselves. 


#6: Paper, or ‘tiles’, are 3.5 inches square.

Reason: Zentangles are designed to be finished in a short time. They’re friendly. They’re manageable. There is a sense of accomplishment that comes from creating something beautiful from start to finish in one sitting. The small size also makes it portable (Doctor’s waiting room? No problem. Two-hour wait for an oil change? Yes please!). And because it’s small, it’s easy to turn, making drawing in one direction over another more comfortable. 


#7: No using stencils, rulers, or graph paper. 

Reason: In short, there is no zen to be had in the preoccupation with perfection. There’s a certain joy in letting the pen wander without being confined to a grid or rigid space. Imperfection makes art more interesting… embrace it! Also, see #2. 

“It is the nature of all greatness not to be exact.” -Edmund Burke


#8 No erasers. 

Reason: Anything that interrupts the drawing process is going to create a shift in focus. Then it becomes less about drawing those slow deliberate lines and breathing, and more about fixing/changing stuff. Just keep drawing and let it evolve. Get comfortable with the idea that mistakes can be turned into something good and unexpected (and exciting!).

If you’re not a rule-follower, it’s ok. Not following these steps does not mean your line art is in any way bad or wrong; it just means it’s not technically a Zentangle. I’m a CZT and 99% of what I draw isn’t technically Zentangle... I’m here for the art too. It's good to know the difference, but don’t let it be a label and keep you from enjoying the journey. 

Comments and respectful discussion are welcome. Trolls will be bound and tangled. ;o)


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On sharing: I have gotten several requests for permission to share this post. I have no problem with anyone (CZT or otherwise) sharing it, either in print or online, as long as no changes are made to what I've written and I am credited as the author. If you share a link, that's great... if you aren't linking directly to this page please throw in my blog website too. Thank you so much for all the sharing, forwarding, exclaiming, virtual hugs, and 100% positive feedback.

-Sandy




•  •  •  •  •  •  •
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120 comments:

  1. Spot on Sandy. I'm not a CZT , I'm not an artist. I'm some who was lucky enough to find Zentangle by accident. You know you're doing it when it feels right. And now, I feel confident enough to try other art forms. Tangling is definitely different and definitely helps to relax and focus the mind. It's one of the most important things I have learned in my whole life and I agree with your words here. Axxx

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    1. thanks Annie! I discovered it by accident too.

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    2. I saw a video on Zentangle.com showing someone using a ruler to create a pattern. Isn't that against all that CZT's & the Founders have tried to convey? Just curious. I started out using official tiles and only Micron pens. I was going through pens like crazy and they aren't cheap so I changed to sketch paper or card stock and switched to Copic pens which I found are also expensive but last much longer. I also like using color on some things. I call it Zentangle if I use an "official" pattern because it's not my pattern and believe in giving credit when due. I've seen patterns I've doodled in the margins of notebooks since Grade school posted as ZT patterns - just coincidental and am sure I'm not alone. No big deal really but I find the expense prohibitive for people it would help such as the women I counsel who have had childhood trauma. I teach it to them and provide them with cheaper supplies. I just show them the DVD I purchased 6 yrs ago with my kit. Not making any money as its part of my job. Can't bill for it. I don't call myself a CZT but art & the meditative aspects are healing. Thanks. I left forums too. !

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    3. You're right, using rulers and the like is technically not Zentangle... but it is a personal preference. I know several tanglers that just cannot get comfortable with imperfection, so that's what they do. It makes them happy, so I leave it alone. And I know lots of people that use other materials besides the 'official' tiles. As long as it's 3.5 inches square (for the reasons I listed above) it's still a Zentangle. The founders aren't jerks... they just wanted people to have the best materials available to them for their art. That doesn't mean everyone likes the texture of Fabriano paper and there are lots of other great options out there. Nothing wrong with that at all. Personally I love the official tiles because the paper is toothy and it forces me to draw slowly, but I also love 60# Hammermill cover text paper because it shades like a dream. And I love the way Copic multiliners feel in my hand (they're comfortable to draw with... and let's be honest, they're pretty!) but the ink never lasts for me. The nibs aren't as durable as Microns. I'm heavy-handed when I draw so the nibs eventually either bend and split or retreat in fear back into the metal nib sleeve. ;o) Glad you use what makes you happy and that it works for you. Happy tangling.

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    4. I agree with irishlass61 with regard to the fact that the official supplies are much too expensive for people on pensions, etc like me. I discovered Zentangle by accident, too, and am going to try to teach myself with the help of blogs like, yours, Sandy, and all the others out there, and all the design instructions, etc in books, on pinterest, etc. I've borrowed books from my local library, and am going to make my own step out instructions cards for the tangles in them, and taking notes of hints and tips and storing them on my computer for future reference. I'm buying some books that I've got from the Library because I've discovered I really need to have them all the time. Now I just have to find some artists paper that I can afford to buy. It is so expensive here in Australia, I guess because they are all imported and the exchange rate is soooooo bad at the moment. I'll get there, though, even if I have to use ordinary copy paper to start with. I actually bought some Micron pens by accident on ebay, not realising that they were the ones I needed, and managed to get them at a really good price. I could buy the supplies from the Zentangle teachers here in Australia, but they are just soooooooo expensive, and I simply cannot afford them.

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    5. have you tried bristol paper, Christine? That's what the Zentangle Apprentice tiles are made out of. It's smoother, easy to find, and definitely less expensive... maybe you'd like that? FYI there are CZTs out there who will do classes over Skype, etc... if you want more info let me know and I'll see if I can find out more.

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  2. So well put. It's so easy, with so much inspiration and encouragement and challenges and the like to lose sight of the core values of where this thing started. And every so often I like to go back to those basics and do a tile using those pure principles - and when I do it FEELS so great. Because in those moments the process is all, the product is a side effect.

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    1. Just reading your comment made me want to go tangle. lol. Thanks RR.

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  3. I could not have said it better. This is excellent Sandy. Thank you for your insight.

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  4. Great explanation of the process. Like you I have evolved to color. I call my art Freestyle. Hope I can share this with your permission.

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  5. Very well-stated! Thank you for so articulately summarizing the essence of the Zentangle method.

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  6. Awesome! I left a forum because they were always so concerned with someone copying their work. If this is art that is an issue I get that but it stole my only in the zentangle process. Only about 10% of my work follows the strict rules of zentangle but let it be known that I found zentangle in a extremely stressful and painful period of my life and it has saved me and for that I will be eternally grateful! Tangle on people! Thank you for your words!

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    1. I left almost all forums... I don't like conflict. lol

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  7. Thank you, thank you Sandy! I'm going to copy the url for your post and redirect people here from my own blog today, because I think this is such an important post. I'm a big fan of doodling, actually, but it's totally different from Zentangle and I use if for different purposes. I love your clear exposition of what Zentangle does for us. (from a CZT 11)

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    1. thanks for sharing, I appreciate it!

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  8. Beautifully stated. Thanks for sharing this. I will definitely share some of these great points with my students.

    Cris Letourneau, CZT

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  9. Great post Sandy! Is it okay if i include a link to this in the newsletter I send out?

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  10. Wonderful post Sandy. Thank you for expressing the differences between Zentangle and art so well.

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  11. What a fantastic post! Thank you so much for taking time to thoughtfully articulate the differences between tangling and Zentangle - hope you don't mind if I share this with my Facebook page followers. :)

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  12. Sandy this is just so eloquently stated. Thank you for your creative written and tangled contributions to the Zentangle community and artists everywhere. Beautiful!
    Sadelle, Wiltshire, CZT #7, Putney, VT

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  13. Excellent post. I have no artistic flair, but that is ok. I can be content with drawing tiles because The Zentangle® Method says that is ok and I end up with something that pleases me.

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    1. what you may lack in artistic flair you make up for in wordsmithing. Love your name. ;o) awesome, thanks for the reply.

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  14. Thank you, thank you, Sandy! I get so tired of wanting to say this over and over to people on the Zentangle Facebook group who haven't bothered to read the about information or research Zentangle. You explain it so very well.

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  15. Sandy, an awesome description of what this is all about! I was so proud of my first few tiles, and showed them to my sister, she said "what do you do with them?" My reply was "nothing, I enjoy creating them, and I enjoy looking at them!" Everything we do does not have be toward a 'finished product'. I still go back and enjoy looking at those first few beginning tiles. And I've even used Zentangle images on cards, on quilts, and totebags. I've made hundreds of cards with a tangled greyhound image on it and tangled dog paw pads on it to donate to greyhound adoption groups. And I enjoyed everyone making every one of them. So I do have an end to some of my work now, but still love just 'tangling', emerging myself in the drawing. Thank you for this wonderful article to remind me of how much enjoyment I have gotten from Zentangle!

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    1. People have asked me what I do with my tiles... I occasionally leave them for others to find, or share them... but mostly I do them to make me happy. I've got tiles everywhere. lol.

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  16. Sandy - Thank you for saying what I feel when I tangle. With your permission, I would like to add a link to this post in the resource list I make available to my students. I don't know how the essence of The Zentangle Method could be stated more clearly. Linda Dochter, CZT

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  17. Thank you Sandy! This is so accurate, and Terrific and wholesome!

    Pete Jones CZT14

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  18. Can I share this with my students?

    Thanks in advance, Pete Jones CZT14

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  19. What a wonderful article! I wish I had written it, because it sums up exactly what 'Zentangle' is so well. Is it OK if I print it off, laminate it and carry it in my tote bag? That way I can whip it out at a moment's notice when people start arguing with me, that they have been "doing it for years" or "it's only a marketing ploy" etc etc I made my first tile on February 12th 2012; I feel like it is tattooed on my forehead, because it was such a momentous moment ! I do one every day and although I use tangling now also as an "artistic helper" I STILL make a plain black and white tile every day, which is my necessary "dose of calm" to enhance each day. Thanks so much for going to the trouble of writing it, tho' I can't help feeling that seeing it on your blog here and on Linda's site, that it is a case of "preaching to the converted". It needs to be up on a billboard in the centre of town !! :-))

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    1. you can print and share as much as you like but I'm gonna recommend that you not roll it up like a newspaper and smack people with it. lol. I totally understand your frustration... it's the whole reason I wrote this.

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  20. Thank you Sandy. You have put into words a great description of what Zentangle is all about. Would you mind if I share your article with my students?
    Lianne CZT13

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    1. I don't mind at all. Thanks for asking.

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  21. Well written! I'm not a CZT anf have never taken a class but I draw, doodle and tangle just for the fun, relaxation and peace it brings. I don't feel like I have to follow the rules and I don't even care if it's an official zentangle. It's just for me and my peice of mind. What's all the arguement about anyway, fighting is not very zen, so pick up a pen, draw and relax.

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  22. Well said...thank you for articulating so nicely all the things I wished I could have said that well. I will definitely put a link on my Facebook page.

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  23. Thank you Sandy!! This was SO helpful. I love Zentangle, but got a little distracted by the art of it and then confused. Now I can relax and enjoy that totally relaxed experience I enjoyed so much when I didn't worry so much about the art of it.

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  24. Thank you for a terrific post! As a new CZT just starting to teach, I want my students to understand that it's about the process not the product. A copy of your post is going into my teaching binder!

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  25. I hear what you are saying and can respect it all. However, this then means that the art on the cover of the Tangle Guide is not a Zentangle as it does not met the criteria you have set in your article. Yes?

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    1. It isn't, but that piece wasn't designed to be a Zentangle. It was designed to be pretty and showcase some of the patterns in the guide in an attractive way. That is categorized as Zentangle-Inspired Art, or ZIA for short. A lot of tangle art on the web falls into this category.

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    2. It's also why the cover clearly states, "ZENTANGLE-INSPIRED COVER ART © 2015 MICHELE BEAUCHAMP, CZT" :-)

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  26. I agree with the others. You kit the nail on the head! I would also like to share this with my students if that is permissible. Thanks for sharing what we knew but did not know how to put in to words!

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    1. feel free to share...thanks for asking!

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  27. Fabulous!!! SO very well articulated. The ONLY thing I would add would be that I find starting and ending each Zentangle with gratitude and appreciation so very important. It sets the stage and frames the time into a ritual type of atmosphere for me. I've gotten away from it for a while. Your words here are pulling me back. Thank you so much!

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  28. Hi Sandy Your word are so true I have been doing Zentangles a long time and I love the Zen part and many a day it has helped me through Thank You Judy

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    1. ditto what you wrote!. thanks for the comment.

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  29. What they all said. Excellent article. I will save the link and send folks here. Good job!

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  30. So EXCELLENT! I would also like to share with my students!

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  31. Bravo!!! I am like you where I do like to create a lot of art pieces, but true Zentangle, is a method, a moment, a meaningful way to get into the Zen!!! I love what you wrote and first found it on Tangle Patterns, but wanted to let you personally know how wonderful it was to read your post!! A great reminder!! :0) Annette

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  32. Thanks for writing so eloquently the distillation of a truth that it is so easy to lose sight of. It's so easy to lose one's way when there's a little Perfectionist imp constantly sitting on your shoulder & chattering in your ear - this is ammunition to throw at them & a timely reminder to me not to get so wrapped up in the minutiae..... if that makes sense......
    Paula (PEP)

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    1. it does make sense, and I have one of those on my shoulder too!

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  33. Thank's for your wise words Sandy! I am glad i run into this post. If I had been younger when I found out about zentangel-method ( only8 month ago) I would probably have done anything to become a CZT. But zen is well known to me, I got into zen- meditation 1986 and it still means much to me. Your words encourage me, I have shared this post on FB and when I get home ( I am on a small trip right now) I will print this and keep it to remind myself when I stumble and get away from path. So thank you once again Sandy from my hearth.

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    1. thank you for sharing, Anita... I'm glad it's helpful to you.

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  34. Wow you nailed it! I have been creating art for as long as I can remember and way back 60 years ago our art dept warmed up to patterning exercises. I doodle and tangle on everything. its relaxing. I don't feel the need to be trained, I can do this very well on my own..and teach patterning as well. Too bad the blog only accepts art from CZT's.

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    1. if you're on facebook you're welcome to share your art on my page. I'd love to see it. Look for the line that says 'feel free to join me here' and click on the word 'here'.

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  35. May
    Canada

    Thanks for the explanation. I use tangle patterns in my artwork but I don't refer to them as Zentangles either. Instead, I call them Zentangle-inspired art, or ZIA, which is I think the proper term.

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    1. Definitely a "post for the ages." I think I will also include it in my classes from now on. I put a link to it in my own blog post yesterday, so my readers can come here and read it. In June of 2014 I wrote about the same issue (Doodling vs. Zentangle®) from a slightly different angle but the sentiment is the same: http://www.drawingfromtheday.com/a-blog-on-art-creativity-and-mindfulness/doodling-zentanglewhich-is-it
      Thank you for writing this!

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  36. thank you so much, Sandy for sharing your wisdom with us. I first read it on Linda's site ( another wonderful sharing spirit) and with your permission I'd like to share it with my tangling friends. I love your mookas!

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    1. thank you, winful! I agree, Linda really is wonderful!

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  37. Sandy, this is beautifully written...and just the way we tangle: passionately confident :) Thank you.

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  38. Thank you, Sandy, for the clear, concise information. For me, it was a great reminder about why I started doing this form of creative expression, just when I needed it most. Thank you for allowing Linda Farmer to share it on TanglePatterns.com because that is where I first read it.

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    1. thank you for the kind comment, Camille!

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  39. Couldn't be more clear!!! Thanks for sharing!

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  40. this is wonderfully written Sandy, I have all your books and I started zentangle in 2013, self taught by looking at all the wonderful patterns and books, started to reliever high anxiety and stress and even though I have branched out I am thankful for the true art of zentangle, right now I am going through some high anxiety and stress again and it is comforting to just relax and only use the strings and the patterns to work thru that and that is what is was meant for, to take away the stress and relax

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    1. I'm glad tangling is working for you! I've contributed art to several books but I haven't published any of my own (yet), so you might be thinking of Sandy Steen Bartholomew. But I'm honored that you thought it was me!

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  41. Sandy, I got back to this post via Linda Farmer's Tanglepatterns.com I am doing my first free Intro to Zentangle class at a local library in a few weeks. (I'm a CZT--#18). I see in your response to Lianne (above) that you authorized her to share this article with one of her classes. With your permission, I'd like to do the same as it is the best articulation of Zentangle that I've seen. I will, of course, make sure that your blog is referenced as the source. Tangle on!

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  42. Sandy,

    Thank you so much for this post! I've shared excerpts and linked back to this post from my blog. I also appreciate you giving the okay to share this article. I am certain it's going to be referred to by tons of folks over the years.

    Cheers!

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  43. Well said, Sandy. Thank you for allowing us to share with our students. You are very kind. (CZT11)

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  44. I so appreciate your thoughts on the Zentangle method. I've had this conversation with 2of my Artist friends 1 being the not so keen, 1 being right on point with understanding the why and how of Zentangles. You've also given me clarity on my why and love of Zentangle. Fabulous! May I share? Thanks

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  45. Sandy, your blog is one of my favorites and many comments here exactly express my sentiments about your statements, so I won't elaborate about how well stated this article is. My husband and I, both CZTs, always tell our students in their introductory class very much the same things. We stress the difference between being Mindful and being Mind-full. I will be sure our students see what you have written either by sharing your URL or in print with your URL included. Thanks!!!

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  46. I am delighted to add my name to the wonderfully long list of people who are so appreciative of what you have written regarding Zentangle. I often times head out on a ZIA adventure with intentions of grandeur only to be stumped by over-imagining, overthinking, over-planning and I find it so refreshing and grounding to come home to a simple Zentangle tile and the beautiful meditative state of following the method. Thanks again Sandy.

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    1. I love this comment so much I just might quote you.

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  47. I'm very much the same. While I'd love to learn more and become a CZT, my life won't allow for it. And I can't draw my way out of a paper bag. But I CAN tangle.

    So many people I know see what I'm doing and say "Oh, I could never do that!" I'm constantly correcting the misconception. Zentangle is a process of drawing simple line variants in ink over a small space while focusing on the work. Anyone who can use a pen can tangle.

    I personally prefer larger works and have an 8x11 sketchbook with paper my Sakura pens won't bleed through. I don't need the work to be correctly labeled as Zentangle; I don't engage in the process for brand recognition. I do it for peace and the journey.

    I carry a small pencil pouch with mechanical pencil (for lightly tracing strings), a set of Sakura pens ranging from .005 to .08, and a tiny pocket notebook. I also carry a small clipboard with a few 3"x5" cards on it for smaller projects since I can't afford to buy tangling tiles (the pens were a much treasured gift). These live in my purse and take up next to no space at all and travel with me everywhere.

    My 5 year old daughter is hospitalized often due to a multitude of life threatening medical conditions. Her hospital room is one of my favorite places to tangle because I can bring peace to the quiet and emerge with something beautiful.

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    1. I've spent a lot of time in hospitals with my mom over the last several years so I know how useful it can be. Danielle, can you email me, please? tanglebucket at gmail dot com. Need to ask you a question.

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  48. I was not able to catch the whole discussion about Zentangle , nor what they were saying what was considered copying a Zentangle design, but do appreciate what you have written. Like yourself I have been doing this for years but I called it my doodles. It is one thing to take an exact piece of work , remove their name and put yours on it. This is wrong and is copied , but it sounds like some people were saying that if you use anything that looks like a Zentangle it is protected by copyright , this would be absurd ! Art inspires people and you can see bits and pieces of one persons art in another's all the time, because it inspires them! If it is being said that you are not able to Reproduce anything similar they taught in the book , then why would you put a book out? We might as well consider all how to books useless if we are not able to use what they taught us. I like yourself will continue to draw, paint , sculpt and doodle whatever comes to my. Mind ! After all, many sites including fb state that what ever one posts online is no longer considered their own !

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    1. well said! keep on releasing your art to the wild.
      thank you for the comment.

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  49. Congrats Sandy, beautiful article and accurate information. Thanks for sharing.
    Best regards from Spanish CZT.

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  50. Could you please leave this post on your blog even if you remove some of your others, Sandy. I think this explains Zentangle so clearly and in a way everyone can understand. I'm going to save this post to go back to when I need reminding what Zentangle is really about. I'm hoping that it will help with my clinical depression, PTSD, anxiety, stress and dealing with the fact that I am virtually housebound now. I don't want to have to have more ECT treatment again, which I had several years ago, but at the moment I feel like I need it. I'm hoping Zentangle will help me avoid that. If only the paper and pens were not so expensive, though. I'm worrying about being able to get the supplies I need, so that's just adding to my stress levels. Oh, well, I guess I'll work it out. I have contacted one of the CZTs here in Hobart, Tasmania, but still have not had a response from her after 5 days, so I guess I'll have to try the other one, even though she lives a lot further away.

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    1. Hi Christine, thanks for the comment. I've heard people say that the cost of official Zentangle supplies is prohibitive outside the US, especially with shipping costs added in. Try bristol paper; that's what the Apprentice tiles are made out of. It's a little smoother than the regular tiles but a lot of people really like it. And it shades like a dream. If you want something a little rougher, cold press watercolor paper is good and has the added bonus of being able to handle wet media. Any fiber tip pen will give you a little drag on the paper which will help to keep you drawing slowly. Focus on your breathing when you draw, and it will help.

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  51. Thanks for this post. I know it's a few years old, but it still rings true! I have shared it on my blog for more people to read. I think it is so important for people to understand that Zentangle is about the steps, the method, the rules, and not about the outcome--even if the outcome is pretty awesome most of the time!

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  52. Oh my god, thank you for writing this. It's just fabulous. I will link to it and forward the link to everyone I know who doesn't get the difference. What a great service you provided here!!! Thank you, you smart cookie.

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  53. Thank you Sandy. Looking forward to sharing this with Square One and my tangling friends. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

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